Skiing (and snowboarding) down Everest

by JAKE NORTON

August 2009
Lots of news out there recently about the Indo-Tibetan Border Police Expedition, which is on Everest as we speak and hoping in the next month to send a team to the summit and ski back down. Colin over at the Mount Everest | British Story blog posted today about another famous ski descent of Everest – the […]

Lots of news out there recently about the Indo-Tibetan Border Police Expedition, which is on Everest as we speak and hoping in the next month to send a team to the summit and ski back down.

Colin over at the Mount Everest | British Story blog posted today about another famous ski descent of Everest – the first of its kind – when Yuichiro Miura attempted to ski from the summit in 1970. (Interestingly, Yuichiro is also the second oldest person to summit Everest. He climbed it in 2008 at age 75. But, the age record still stands with a Nepali man, Min Bahadur Sherchan, who reached the top in 2008 at age 76!)

Unfortunately, a lot of people forget the most impressive ski descent of Everest to date…and, the only true descent. No, it wasn't Kit DesLauriers, or Yuichiro Miura, nor will it be the Indo-Tibetan Border Police if they are successful this year.

Rather, it was a relatively quiet man named Davorin "Davo" Karničar. On October 7, 2000, Davo pulled off what no one had before*: a full ski descent of Everest, from top to bottom. An amazing feat, strangely Davo has gotten scant recognition for his feat. Check out this video below of some of Davo's impressive ski descents, and read more here:

Skiing 7 Summits film about Slovenian extreme skier Davo Karničar.

* Another oft-forgotten feat of Everest is Marco Siffredi's snowboard descent of the Great (or Norton) Couloir on Everest's North Face in May, 2001. Marco tragically died on an attempt the following year to snowboard the stunning Hornbein Couloir.

7 comments on “Skiing (and snowboarding) down Everest”

  1. i’ve often thought it was weird that these two didn’t get the publicity that many less bold expeditions get.
    huge respect to both individuals.

  2. Climbing up the Everest is already a feat in itself which requires stamina, energy and will-power. Climbing up and then having the energy to manoeuvre yourself down the world’s highest mountain on a pair of skis is a marvellous achievement which very few people dare to risk their lives for. It is very strange that Mr Karnicar did not get widespread coverage of his achievement and it is a pity really. I am sure that personally he is very pleased with himself, but getting publicity and becoming renowned for this descent is equally important. I was very sorry to hear about Mr Siffredi’s unfortunate death. These people literally put their life at stake and the media should give them all the coverage they can get, as their love for the sport is amazing.

  3. Just to be clear, Yuichiro Muira didn't attempt to ski from the summit of Everest in 1970, he skied from two thousand feet lower, and in fact never summited that day. And it should always be noted that Karnicar's remarkable feat was aided by supplemental oxygen, as was Siffredi's. Davo said himself that someday someone would do it without oxygen. I point these things out not to diminish the accomplishments but to more carefully define them as has been done in terms of the record books.

  4. I've tried to finish the comment with further details, but it was sent early, can't edit or delete it. Nevermind. There were others as well without oxygen, before Davo.
    Nevermind

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